No. 37 - July 1979

 

DO YOUR GIBB 571 WINCHES GET UP-TIGHT?

 

Especially on a hot, humid, sunny day, this may also happen to the Tanzer 22 sailor, particularly when he or she is out on the water and the wind is steadily dropping. A cool drink will help the crew, but here is a tip on what to do for your winches. (As outlined in the no. 12 (1979) issue of "Geartest".)

 

These black anodized alloy sheet winches are fitted with nylon sleeve inserts within the alloy drums, rotating on plated bronze shafts integral with the base plates. For several seasons they seem to function perfectly, but later they begin to tighten up and bind despite stripping and cleaning. The problem is particularly noticeable in strong sunshine and is caused by a combination of swelling of the nylon by water absorption plus compression of the nylon from outside by expansion of the drum in hot sunlight.

 

Gibb have recognized the problem and report that these particular winches were fitted with nylatron, a nylon 6 molybdenum disulphide bearing material which proved to be unstable, particularly in hot or damp conditions. The diameter tolerances did not always allow enough room for expansion. Once the problem was clearly identified, they produced a new split skirt bearing which is superior in design and moulded in Delrin AF (Acetal impregnated with PTFE), an inherently much more stable material. They have had no reoccurrence of this problem. In the meantime, those of us who have the drums fitted with the old bearings can effectively overhaul them simply by passing a 7/8 in. diameter reamer through the bore of the drum. This restores the original bearing clearance with satisfactory results.

 

 

MORC (For we Canadians, I hear it is pronounced 'Morsy')

 

Many of you have written to the office requesting ratings and parti­cularly mentioning that a MORC Station was opening up in your area. We received a notice from them stating that effective May 22nd the Tanzer 22 One Design Association has been given Provisional Status for its members to join MORC International and apply for a MORC/ODA Rating Certificate with the following rating: Outboard = 17.9

 

It seems you have two choices. You can apply for a MORC Handicap Certificate ($20.00) and race in handicap races; or you can apply for both the Handicap Certificate and the membership in MORC ODA ($15.00 per year), together with the MORC ODA Certificate ($5.00 per year) and race the handicap race with the handicap certificate, and the one-design race with a MORC/ODA Certificate.

 

For further information, check your station representative or write to Midget Ocean Racing Club, International Offices, 19120 Detroit Road, Cleveland, Ohio, 44116; tel.: 216-333-0575.

 




 

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